Published: 4 August 2020

Children's Day 2020

More Info: https://aboriginalchildrensday.com.au/ Click Here

What is Children’s Day?

National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day (Children’s Day) is our national day dedicated to celebrating Indigenous and Torres Strait Islander children. Children’s Day is celebrated across the country each year on 4 August.

History of Children’s Day

In 1988, the first National Aboriginal and Islander Children’s Day was established on 4 August and was set against the backdrop of protests led by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and their supporters during the bicentennial year. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders peoples felt a day was needed to celebrate Indigenous and Torres Strait Islander children, to give them confidence and make them feel special and included.

The date 4 August was historically used to communally celebrate the birthdays of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children who were taken from their families at a young age, without knowing their birthday – the Stolen Generations.

Children’s Day has grown every year, becoming a major event in the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children, families and community organisations. In communities throughout Australia this special day has been celebrated with activities such as cultural events, open days, arts and crafts, storytelling, face painting, concerts, morning teas and community barbecues.

SNAICC organises a national launch event for Children’s Day, held at a different location each year.

Every year the wider community has increasingly taken the lead in celebrating Children’s Day with amazing and diverse celebrations across the country. SNAICC produces and distributes resources to help local communities and organisations celebrate the day, including 15,000 Children’s Day bags and other resources to support more than 500 community events across Australia.

Why is it important?

The majority of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children are thriving and growing up strong in their cultures, with support from their families and communities.However, a significant number of Indigenous and Torres Strait Islander children continue to face ongoing challenges stemming from colonisation and its effects. This includes discrimination, poverty, systemic removal, intergenerational trauma, dislocation from land and culture, and community disempowerment.

To achieve equality, we must approach these challenges through a holistic approach, considering Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children’s well-being, safety and development.
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children are 2.5 times more likely to be developmentally vulnerable early in life than non-Indigenous children, and only half as likely to access early child care services. See The Family Matters Report 2019

While we know rates for preschool enrolments (4-year-olds) are relatively high for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children, attendance rates are low in each state and territory.

Children who are developmentally vulnerable are less likely to do well at school, and are more likely to leave school early and have poorer life outcomes.

This year at Jimmies we will be taking the Indigenous and Torres Strait Islander students for a lunch and to discuss the day, their well-being, their goals and future pathways.